Confidence Should Start at Hiring

Just the other night I was at a birthday party for one of the leading entrepreneurs in the St. Louis area. It was hosted at a friend of his house. The guest list included long-time friends and many business leaders. I will let you in on a conversation I had. It has to do with confidence.

As the night wore on I met several business leaders I had not previously known. That is my cue to start asking questions. I want to know what obstacles they are facing. This information helps me in crafting my programs and presentations for others. The more information I can obtain by listening, the more helpful I can be to my audiences when I speak and my coaching clients when we meet.

Creating A Culture of Confidence

One man started asking me about my speaking and coaching business. I explained what I mean about a Culture of Confidence™. Every business, every organization and every individual has a “culture” in which they operate. In an organization this culture can be intentional or accidental. Either way, it exists.

Many organization executives do not even realize this is happening. These cultures range from very good to very bad. Steve Jobs created a culture of innovation. His employees were encouraged to think big and think differently. He used this basic philosophy to propel the success of his company.

As I spoke with this business leader we got around to the question of creating this Culture of Confidence™ with all of the employees, no matter their position in the company. If the organization as a whole has this attitude, the organization and its people will all prosper.

Employee Engagement

“What about those employees who are just there for the paycheck?” he asked. Here is how I responded.

When you hire someone, you are the person or organization responsible for making the hiring decision, not the applicant. Your organization makes the determination at that time and place that this applicant is the right person for the job. That decision is on you.

Most people who accept employment want to succeed. It is inherent in our nature to want to do well. It is rare to find someone who goes through the job application process with the intention of failing.

Poor Hiring Practices Are Management Errors

If the employee on the job seems to be there just to get a paycheck, that is on management, not the employee. Somehow that employee got through the screening process and was deemed “suitable” for the position.

If the organization really did make a mistake in hiring that person, get rid of them promptly. If that person who was once deemed qualified has simply started to drift off course, make every effort to immediately re-direct them and get them back on course.

Replacing Employees is Not Cost Effective

Replacing employees at any level is expensive and not productive. If you hire well, help those new-hires become confident that they are part of the team and let them know that they were selected because the organization believed they were the right person for the job.

Start creating a Culture of Confidence™ on day one and it will help every individual in the organization to be decisive and productive.

Begin Your Culture of Confidence

If you would be open to a conversation about me speaking at one of your events, or exploring how creating a Culture of Confidence™ can help your organization, contact me.

Get my free ebook and learn how you can begin to create your own Culture of Confidence.

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